Steady State Cardio and Fat Loss


I’ve been spending a lot of time working with my trainer and doing research on my own about how to get the results I want, what the obstacles are for my success, and what is the best way to get where I want to be. There’s so much information out there, some dated, some recent, and all of it confusing!

The more recent lesson I’ve been getting has been about steady-state cardio. Not all cardio, not metabolic or interval training, but just steady state, endurance cardio. Most people know me as a new runner. I completed my first half marathon February 2011 and have since done 2 more. I’m looking to add a few more races to my accomplishments this year, but as I have been looking at my training plans, and how to balance my resistance/weight training with my endurance training, I’ve been reading a lot about the conflicting nature of these two types of training.

Steady-state cardio is especially challenging for women, regrettably. The way our bodies are meant to function, once we hit a certain point in the cardio threshold, our wonderfully versatile bodies start to cling to fat for two reasons: 1) because that is our main source of fuel at longer endurances and 2) because for women, the cardio triggers a natural response to protect ourselves so we are better able to bear children.

No, I’m not saying fit, trim women can’t bear children. However, our bodies have natural instincts and the one triggered by excessive cardio is a flight response that essentially says you need to have that extra fat to protect yourself. It’s annoying, it sucks, and unfortunately, it’s nature. Another reason to ask Mother Nature what she has against women.

Compared to steady-state cardio, interval or metabolic training challenges your heart rate and often will not only raise your metabolism during your work out but keep it elevated anywhere from 24 to 36 hours after your work out is done. You continue to burn calories and resources as if you were working out for an extra day!

It really throws a lot of challenges into planning an endurance training regimen, though, if you want to have results in your muscle definition and drop fat without dropping muscle. It’s something for which I have yet to find a good balance.

I was recently sent this article that I think will do a much better job at explaining how it works and why. I hope you find it as helpful as I did.

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2 thoughts on “Steady State Cardio and Fat Loss

  1. Vicky Leung says:

    Makes sense! I’ve found that the time I spend in the gym on weights and resistance training definitely complements my running. I’ve been told to continually change up my workouts because your body gets efficient when it does the same exercises repeatedly. This is a great reminder!

    • Saylan says:

      Totally. Even when working the same exercises back in, try for a twist on them. Planks are a great example that you can tweek and change the same workout to give a variety of results!

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