[Re-Blog] Women are dying to be thin

I’m always skeptical of infographics since they’re often skewed to support a bias, and while this one is probably no different, I think it raises some good questions about how women perceive their bodies.

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Recipe Roundup: Sweet Cucumber Kimchi

Sweet Cucumber Kimchi

I’ve always had a thing for sweet kimchi. I like the spicy stuff too, but it doesn’t settle well for me. A restaurant near here makes great kimchis using sprouts and cucumbers. As I’ve been messing around with ideas in an effort to increase my vegetable intake (an area of my diet that is sorely lacking), I remembered this all-vegetable dish.

Unfortunately for me, a quick Google search soon proved that most people make a spicy, or pseudo-spicy, kimchi similar to the standard Korean variations.

So where to go from here? Among all of the recipes I found, I was able to glean the base items that go into a good kimchi recipe: vinegar, salt, veggies (usually greens and legumes), and spices. Below is my variation based on that summary. I also had to tweak the seasoning to suit what I happened to have in my spice rack.

Notes:

  • Use as much, or as little, of each vegetable as you wish. The main goal is that everything should be able to be submerged in the liquid. Below is simply what I used given the size of my dish.
  • The last two seasonings were just what I had lying around that complimented the flavour I wanted. They may not work for your version, so feel free to substitute whatever seasonings work best for you. Chili peppers and other spicy seasonings are usually popular.
  • Balance of sweetness to the bitterness of the vinegar is subjective. What I’ve listed is what made the balance I was looking for but it may be way too bitter still, so adjust accordingly.
  • Cucumber kimchi does not keep long. Consume within a day or two of making it.

Ingredients

  • 3 mini cucumbers, sliced into thin sticks
  • 1 orange bell pepper, sliced into thin sticks
  • 2 green onions, finely chopped
  • 2 1/2 cups white vinegar
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • garlic to taste
  • mustard powder to taste

Instructions

  1. Pour vinegar into an airtight-capable bowl or jar.
  2. Chop veggies and add them to the vinegar.
  3. Add in sugar, 1/4 cup at a time, stirring and tasting until desired balance of sweetness is reached.
  4. Add other seasonings as desired.
  5. Chill in fridge for at least 30-60 minutes.
  6. Serve in liquid, chilled.

I’ve usually had this served with the liquid to me but, from my research, it seems to be dependent on the cook’s preference. If you wish to remove the liquid, be sure to let your veggies soak for at least an hour, or overnight.

Sweet Cucumber Kimchi

Sweet Cucumber Kimchi with Green Onion and Orange Bell Pepper.

This dish is a great compliment to a hearty warm meal and it can be very refreshing in the warm summer days. I hope you enjoy!

Recipe Roundup: Quinoa with Spiced Meat and Cheddar Cheese

All Mixed Together

In looking for a healthy carb option for my lunches while I’m on a higher intensity training schedule, I came across this recipe. Given what I had in my kitchen at the time (10:00 pm on a Sunday night) I modified it to suit my needs.  It still worked out really well so after encouragement from Vicky, I’ve decided to post it. For those who checked out the above link, you’ll notice my recipe is different. The ingredients below are what I used in my variation. I love garlic and cheese, so please keep that in mind. The original called for 2 gloves of garlic and 1/2 cup of cheese. In my second batch I also used peppers.

For me, this makes 2 filling lunches (not 4-6 servings as per the original). Probably for most people 4 would be the most reasonable amount of servings but you may find that on the small side if that’s the whole meal.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup uncooked quinoa
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 package of mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 pound ground meat
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon Italian spice
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped or 1 tablespoon garlic salt
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar

Instructions

  1. Bring 3 cups of water to a boil.
  2. Add quinoa and simmer with a lid for 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

    Uncooked quinoa in boiling water.

    Continue with the recipe but remove from heat when the liquid is absorbed and the quinoa will be soft but chewy with each grain looking like it has popped open.

    Quinoa Done

    How quinoa looks fully cooked.

  3. While the quinoa is cooking, warm the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  4. Add the onion and mushrooms.
  5. Saute until soft.
  6. Add the ground meat, cumin, Italian spice and cinnamon.
  7. Continue cooking until the meat is done. Drain excess fat or liquid as needed.
  8. Add the garlic (or garlic salt) to the meat and saute 1-2 minutes.

    Meat Cooking

    The meat and veggies mixture.

  9. Remove the meat from heat
  10. Mix the meat and quinoa together.
  11. Add the cheddar and stir until mixed.
  12. Serve warm or store for later.

This works out well for me as a quick and protein-full lunch option. I am rarely hungry for the second half of my day and well into my work out, which has always been a challenge. Enjoying a warm meal that tastes good re-heated is also a bonus. I would recommend serving it warm (either fresh or re-heated). Although I do enjoy it cold as well, I’m sure many would prefer it warmed up, if possible.

I like to experiment with the veggies and seasonings a bit each time so feel free to sub in what works for you. I also usually like to put my garlic in before the meat or split it with half before and half after. If you prefer, you could also add in a sauce or stronger spices. This recipe lends itself to adaptations. Sorry there isn’t a prettier final picture. It was going into lunch containers, not onto my plate (sadly).

All Mixed Together

Quinoa with Spiced Meat and Cheddar Cheese.

Bia Sports Watch – More than your Garmin will ever be!

I’m working on a great recipe review that should be out sometime today, but to tide you guys over till then, I wanted to give a shout-out to a great product that needs your help!

Some of the various activities for which the Bia Sportwatch is great. (c) Bia Sport

Bia Sport is preparing to release a really innovative sportswatch that blows the competition away. I’ll highlight my thoughts on it below but please take a minute right now to look at their promo video on kickstarter to see why this technology really fills the niche that current watches don’t for all athletes out there.

Done checking it out? Okay, so here are my thoughts on it.

  1. Safety alert for peace of mind on solo workouts” If you run outside alone (at night or not), or you work out alone at the gym or on the field, what is your current mode of communicating distress if something were to happen to you? I wear a RoadID at the gym and while running and I got one for my father to wear at the gym as well. My thought is, I know who I am, but if I can’t speak, who really knows how to get me the help I need and who to contact if I have to go to the hospital? This watch will transmit your location to a designated emergancy contact FOR FREE as well as to 911 dispatchers for a subscription price. It also will sound a loud alarm to alert anyone nearby that you need assistance. The peace of mind that comes with knowing I can hit a button and my boyfriend knows where I am and that I need help is amazing. I ran last weekend in the scorching heat and he ended up driving my route a couple times to check on me. This watch would have saved him the gas and the worry.
  2. Quick-connect GPS; no more time wasted “finding satellites”“My current watch doesn’t have GPS. I wanted it but I can’t afford it. I also wanted a heart rate monitor. I’d be looking at 300+ minimum for something like that. Backing this now, I can get the watch (which includes heart rate monitoring as a standard feature) and the GPS function for 129$. The fact that I can get it in different colours with nice sleek design at a fraction of the size of the other watches out there (like Garmin, seen here), that’s amazing! Plus, friends and family can follow me on race day online! That’s really handy for my out of town races.

    A Garmin versus the Bia Sportwatch. (c) Bia Sport

  3. Data to your online training log; no more time wasted “sync’ing”” I enter my stuff manually into dailymile. I’m very diligent about it. This would be a great feature to have.
  4. iPod-like ease of use; just one button and a touchscreen” I fiddle with my watch a lot when it comes to pausing the clock or the timers. I like that this will be an easy-to-use interface while in the midst of doing a sprint interval. I can’t always hit the right buttons (or think coherently) after pushing the limits on my cardio training.
  5. Unlimited intervals Run as long as you want without worrying you’ll hit a cap or have to reset it. How annoying would that be?
  6. Battery It runs on an easy to replace, long lasting watch battery. I have the same one in my current watch, which I use for running and every day use. Lasted a long time and cost about 6$ to replace. Think about how much fun it is to charge your Garmin and find out mid-race it died on you.
  7. Colour/DesignIt looks nice. That might not mean much to some, but I like to plan what I wear when I run races, and the idea that this watch can have interchangeable bands and the watch itself is sleek and stunning is a big plus to me.

    The various colours of watches (more band patterns available than pictured). (c) Bia Sport

I know I sound like a saleswoman but really, it’s because I feel so passionate that women runners (and men too!) and atheletes in general have no real choices out there. And the options available are so not designed with the things in mind that I value.

I value security. That is one of my biggest concerns with running. I have always run inside until recently because of the lack of security when running alone. A girl was shot and killed in the apartment building next to mine and I live in what is considered to be a safe and family-friendly neighbourhood. Running outside is now a must-do for me and I want to feel like I’ve done everything I can to be safe and wise about my choices.

I also value functionality. This watch does everything I want: GPS, heart rate monitoring, speaking with my training site, etc. It also is easy to use when in motion and doesn’t weigh me down. I have seriously tiny wrists compared to the rest of me, and a Garmin looks like a monster on my wrist. The fact that the colourful bands are soft and comfortable, won’t pinch or catch, is a bonus.

Bia Sport’s kickstarter campaign has 7 days left and if they can’t reach their goal, the watch won’t be realised. I’m asking anyone and everyone with any interest to please help spread the word and ‘back’ this project. You can give as little as a dollar and pledging to buy a watch through this program (as opposed to when it finally goes to production) is a lot cheaper.

In case you want the link again, here’s their kickstarter page!

Saturday Shake Up: “Chocolate-Covered Strawberries”

So in talking with Vicky (of menubyvicky), we realized that often some of the little things in our routines, things we do to improve the impact of our health regimen or things we’ve learned through experience or research, are often things others may not have come across that could be beneficial to them. This could be anything like knowing about foam rollers for runners or the benefits of some fats over others. There is always going to be something new to learn and share.

With that in mind, and inspired by Vicky’s wonderful suggestion, I’ve decided to share my experiences (and recipes, as simple as they are) with protein shakes. These recipes are very simple and straight forward, but for many who have never made a protein shake before, it may be daunting to figure out solid recipes that you like. It often takes a little trial and error to figure out what your body likes, as well.

When I talk about protein shakes, by the way, I don’t mean the sugar-filled meal replacement drinks you see on the shelves. Even the ‘high protein’ options there have so much sugar (and very little protein) that you might as well blend a chocolate bar and a multi-vitamin together.

I also want to encourage readers and fellow bloggers to send in their own shake recipes or substitutions. I’m always on the look-out for new recipes, especially for ways to incorporate more protein into my routine, and I’ll be looking to post some of your ideas (linking back or crediting to you, whichever you prefer) to share with others. Please send any submissions to me at rapunzels.adventures@gmail.com.

So, for my first Saturday Shake Up post, I’m sharing a recipe I had to improvise in order to use up left-over strawberry protein powder (which I’ve realized I can’t stand on its own).

Chocolate-Covered Strawberries Shakes
Yields: about 2 large glasses

Ingredients

  • 1-2 cups of cold water
  • 1 scoop of chocolate whey protein
  • 1/2 scoop of strawberry whey protein
  • 2-4 frozen strawberries
  • almond milk as preferred

There isn’t a specific order that you must follow in terms of blending the ingredients, but my preferred order goes like this:

  1. Add water (adjust the water to your preference of thinner or thicker shakes)
  2. Add chocolate and strawberry protein powders (ideally, each should be around 25 – 30 grams of protein per full scoop)
  3. Add frozen strawberries
  4. Add almond milk (optional)

If you can’t or don’t want to use the strawberries, use a few ice cubes instead and increase the strawberry protein portion to a full scoop. If your scoops come out to more than 30 grams of protein each, only use half scoops so you’re not wasting protein (as was mentioned in Protein Part 1, we can only absorb around 30 grams at a time) unless you’re splitting the shake with someone or saving half for later. Both are really good options!

You can also sub in more strawberries in lieu of the strawberry protein powder or a couple of small pieces of dark chocolate in lieu of the chocolate protein powder. Please don’t substitute both though since the goal is to get some protein in this shake. If you can’t do almond milk, use 2% instead of skim as skim often has more sugar (aka carbs) than 2%. Start off with a little almond milk, if you’ve never had it, so it doesn’t overwhelm your shake. It can take a couple of uses to grow accustomed to almond milk, but it’s much better in shakes than on its own.

Well there you go! Our first Saturday Shake Up! Feel free to let me know in the comments what you thought of it and if you have a recipe you’d like to share, shoot me an e-mail.

true blood workout

This is a great way to use up all that pent up energy from watching Eric and Alcide! I could really get into at-home work outs if they were all like this!

pumps & iron

In case there was anyone left out there who thought I was cool…here’s a True Blood workout. I know, I know, I need to get a life. But it’s Just. So. Good.

The new season of True Blood premiers this Sunday on HBO and, if you couldn’t infer by the post on my son/plant Lafayette, I’m beyond excited. I love this show. In preparation for an entire summer of watching the insanely attractive supernatural bodies on True Blood (I’m looking at you, Eric Northman), I’ve created this workout. And the best part about it is that you can do it right in your living room, no shoes or equipment required. Heck, you don’t even need to wear pants!

It’s like a drinking game, only healthy.  And, ok, less fun. As you watch each episode keep an eye out for the following things to occur. When they do, complete the…

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Protein Part One: Why and How Much?

I’ve been talking with a lot of fellow runners and fitness pursuers lately about food and diet changes. It has had me thinking more about the common misconceptions out there about ‘healthy’ eating. I was speaking with one friend about little changes in what she consumes and when I mentioned increasing protein, I could see her immediately react with nervousness and she said something that has stuck with me for a while: “I’m not going to be training to be a runner.”

It’s probably because I have been so immersed in learning about the various macronutrients out there that her comment struck me as bizarre. I didn’t realize, until then, that some people don’t really know what certain macronutrients do and how they work into the different fitness routines.

Protein is good for everyone. Period. It has more effect for those who actively do some sort of resistance/weight training, less so in terms of cardio. So let’s look at protein more closely. This will probably be broken into a few segments since there’s a lot of information.

Why Do We Need Protein?

Like with the various fat discussions, the basic answer to why protein is good for us comes down to the composition of protein. It is made of various amino acid chains. Amino acids are the foundation and bricks of muscle. You can’t build or maintain muscle without protein. Amino acids also regulate hormones, enzymes, and immune chemicals. Normally, we can make 12 of the various amino acids internally. The other 8, considered essential amino acids, we have to get from outside sources.

Healthy fats (like Omega-3), including, unfortunately, unhealthy fats, and protein encourage the body to feel full which in turn helps decrease cravings and overall caloric intake. As well, protein has the highest thermic effect of all macronutrients. What that means while we burn energy (ie. calories) to process what we eat, protein takes the most energy and therefore we burn more caloric fuel to process protein than we do carbohydrates or fats.

Carbohydrates can have strong effects on insulin and blood sugar, but when consumed with sufficient amounts of protein, the effect is significantly decreased.

How Much Protein Should We Have?

Currently, the daily recommendation for sedentary individuals, to maintain day-to-day functions, is around 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight or 0.5 grams per pound of body weight. The amount increases to 1.4-2 grams per kilogram of ‘desired’ body weight for active people going as high as 1 gram per pound of ‘desired’ body weight.

I would use caution when looking at ‘desired’ body weight, though. If all that matters is the number on the scale, the above works against you. For example, if I’m 160 pounds and my desired body weight is 130 pounds, by limiting my protein intake to only 130 grams of protein a day, I will drop weight, but that weight will come partially from my muscles. Your body will use muscle tissue as fuel, if need be, and by not feeding your muscles the ‘bricks’ it needs to keep itself building up, then they will become smaller. As muscle weighs more than fat, this effect will result in a lower scale weight.

A better rule to live by, for active individuals, is about 20-30 grams per meal for women and 30-40 grams per meal for men. Overall, 30% of your food on a given day should be protein. The normal maximum amount that can be absorbed at one time on average is about 30-40 grams. This varies based on the overall available muscle mass.

It’s better to have excess protein rather than excess carbohydrates. Carbohydrates convert into glycogen to fuel the muscles during any high intensity activity. If the glycogen is not used within a short time span, it is then stored for later use as fat.

As we know above, protein takes more calories/energy to process and this is partially because protein goes through many more phases before going to storage (if it goes there at all). Any extra protein in the system is first converted to glycogen as fuel for muscles. Any extra is then changed again and used to build up lean muscle mass to a finite amount (varying based on muscle size, so less so for women). After that, it is converted back into glycogen and stored in the muscle as fuel if it is not used right away. It is only after that point, that is could potentially be stored as fat. Keep in mind each step in this process requires converting the protein which in turn burns calories.

In comparing protein to carbohyrdates in terms of processing, it’s easy to see that overloading on carbs can quickly lead to fat store build up. There is 1 step in the conversion process. With protein, there is 4-5 steps that it goes through before it could potentially enter the fat stores of the body. Protein, in addition to going to the muscles first and staying longer, takes 4-5 times more energy to process so it burns way more calories on the way which in turn creates more places for the protein fuel to go before becoming fat.

Is it possible to have too much of protein? Yes, probably it is. It’s possible to have too much of anything, really. The key thing here though is that the limit of ‘too much’ in terms of protein is extremely high and much harder to reach than the limit of carbohydrates or fats. The average person would be very hard pressed to hit that limit without intense over-supplementation. Hitting the carbohydrate limit is easy and the majority of us do it ever day, especially when we fail to combine carbohydrate consumption with high intensity interval training of some kind (not steady-state cardio).

In part two, I’ll tackle the various sources of protein, the traps of ‘high protein’ labels, and ways to increase protein in your daily meals.

Also, keep an eye out this weekend for the start-up of my (protein) shake series!