[Infographic] 10 Exercise/Health Myths

Exercise Myths

A lot of these myths are things I encounter when talking about fitness with people, especially the cardio and scale points. While I have trouble adhering to some of these things (marathon training kind of flies in the face of limiting oneself to 20 minutes of cardio), I know the reasoning behind it.

How many of these facts are new to you? Would they change how you approach your own workouts?

September 15 – Metabolic Legs

I had a couple of exercise goals this weekend to get back into my workout routine as well as trying to break through my plateau. Plateaus are just depressing and they can really kill any motivation if you let them.

In the hopes of bringing something new and challenging to the table, I opted to try a metabolic workout this weekend. I’m new to metabolic training as a whole, only having done a couple of metabolic workouts before, but the general goal is to do short but strong whole body cardio movements (burpees, weight squats, rowing, sprinting, box/sled pushes, etc.) so that the whole body is engaged. With metabolic workouts, you’re trying to keep a high intensity in your routine, so you should be sweaty with a high heart rate well before the end of a set. If you aren’t, you’re not pushing hard enough.

That’s part of the reason I tend to balk at metabolic workouts. I don’t mind getting sweaty, but when my heart rate increases rapidly or through movements where my arms are engaged (holding weights up during cardio, burpees, etc.), I have a very difficult time breathing. I suffer from a case of exercise-induced asthma which pretty much stops me in my tracks after not too long. I’ll save that discussion for another time, but suffice to say, metabolic workouts are the bane of my asthma where weight or resistance training is not. It took a lot more mentally to push through this workout than it does most just in light of my fear of suffocation or passing out. Yes, you do push yourself as hard as you can, but no one really benefits from passing out, do they? I decided I wouldn’t let my fear of collapsing stop me from trying my hardest.

For breaks, I took 5-10 minutes (usually around 5-8 minutes) between sets for recovery. That’s a long time, but the reality is, recovery is key so that you’re able to complete the next set. With resistance training, 1-2 minutes at most is what you’re looking for between sets, but with a metabolic workout, you would not be in good shape to complete the following set if you did that short a break.

Also, I always made two slow-paced laps around the workout room before stopping for water or sitting down to stretch. It helped to bring my heart rate down, allowing me to breathe consistently again, as well as kept the blood flowing in my legs. If I had sat or laid down right away for a period of time, my legs would have seized up (more than they were already doing) and that would have made any further sets even harder. As much as it feels like you just want to lay down for 5-10 minutes, you have to try to walk it off for the first bit. It really does make a difference.

Metabolic Workout – 4 sets (timed) with 5-10 minute walking breaks between each

Bench Jumps: 20 reps – you want to land as softly as possible on the bench, avoiding a loud ‘slam!’ sound on landing. I often have mental challenges with these due to a fear of tripping or falling off the bench. Putting them at the start really helps to prevent it from psyching me out through the rest of the work out. As always, remember to contract the core (abs) when jumping.
Jumping Lunges: 20 reps – even though you’re doing these in fast succession, remember to get into a full lunge position and land on both feet at the same time. I’m prone to landing one and then the other which can not only put too much weight on one leg and knee, it can throw off your balance. Be sure to avoid leaning forward by keeping a pelvic tilt and a straight back in your lunge position.
Burpees: 20 reps – you have to contract the abs while doing these and that is something with which I still struggle. Unlike the video, I add a jump when coming up each time, for extra leg engagement and cardio. I find the key for getting through these is to pace myself. While I am doing this routine for time, by not going as fast as possible in the start, I have enough energy to get through the full 20 reps. If I went all out at the start, I would maybe get 5 done before I had to stop and catch my breath.
Squats: 20 reps – form is key with squats. Avoid leaning forward or shifting your weight to the front part of your foot. You want your chest to be up and facing forward with your butt back (as if you’re about to sit on a chair). If you’ve done deadlifts before, it’s similar to the form in terms of keeping your butt out behind you with your back up. The goal is to get to at least 90 degrees on your squats every time.
Jumping Squats: 10 reps – form is just as important but you will be coming onto the fore-foot a bit in order to push-off for the jumps. You want to get as close to 90 degrees as possible, still, and don’t let your upper body tilt forward (facing towards the ground).
Box Push: 2 passes @ 45 pounds – a pass is along one whole side of the gym, for me, so the distance can vary if you have a smaller space. When pushing the box or sled, you want to remember to keep the hips down (you don’t want your but high in the air or your back to be curved inward). Remember to push from the glutes and to sprint as hard as you can for both pushes.

When I did these for time, I had negative splits which really encouraged me but I found I almost became too focussed on the time as each set passed. If you have someone who can time you, it may be best to have them record it without telling you so you don’t feel pressured to keep up or beat your previous time. Some might like that pressure, but I found it distracting in the last few sets.

My splits:
Set 1: 5:32.74
Set 2: 5:28.79
Set 3: 5:26.30
Set 4: 5:22.54

Bia Sports Watch – More than your Garmin will ever be!

I’m working on a great recipe review that should be out sometime today, but to tide you guys over till then, I wanted to give a shout-out to a great product that needs your help!

Some of the various activities for which the Bia Sportwatch is great. (c) Bia Sport

Bia Sport is preparing to release a really innovative sportswatch that blows the competition away. I’ll highlight my thoughts on it below but please take a minute right now to look at their promo video on kickstarter to see why this technology really fills the niche that current watches don’t for all athletes out there.

Done checking it out? Okay, so here are my thoughts on it.

  1. Safety alert for peace of mind on solo workouts” If you run outside alone (at night or not), or you work out alone at the gym or on the field, what is your current mode of communicating distress if something were to happen to you? I wear a RoadID at the gym and while running and I got one for my father to wear at the gym as well. My thought is, I know who I am, but if I can’t speak, who really knows how to get me the help I need and who to contact if I have to go to the hospital? This watch will transmit your location to a designated emergancy contact FOR FREE as well as to 911 dispatchers for a subscription price. It also will sound a loud alarm to alert anyone nearby that you need assistance. The peace of mind that comes with knowing I can hit a button and my boyfriend knows where I am and that I need help is amazing. I ran last weekend in the scorching heat and he ended up driving my route a couple times to check on me. This watch would have saved him the gas and the worry.
  2. Quick-connect GPS; no more time wasted “finding satellites”“My current watch doesn’t have GPS. I wanted it but I can’t afford it. I also wanted a heart rate monitor. I’d be looking at 300+ minimum for something like that. Backing this now, I can get the watch (which includes heart rate monitoring as a standard feature) and the GPS function for 129$. The fact that I can get it in different colours with nice sleek design at a fraction of the size of the other watches out there (like Garmin, seen here), that’s amazing! Plus, friends and family can follow me on race day online! That’s really handy for my out of town races.

    A Garmin versus the Bia Sportwatch. (c) Bia Sport

  3. Data to your online training log; no more time wasted “sync’ing”” I enter my stuff manually into dailymile. I’m very diligent about it. This would be a great feature to have.
  4. iPod-like ease of use; just one button and a touchscreen” I fiddle with my watch a lot when it comes to pausing the clock or the timers. I like that this will be an easy-to-use interface while in the midst of doing a sprint interval. I can’t always hit the right buttons (or think coherently) after pushing the limits on my cardio training.
  5. Unlimited intervals Run as long as you want without worrying you’ll hit a cap or have to reset it. How annoying would that be?
  6. Battery It runs on an easy to replace, long lasting watch battery. I have the same one in my current watch, which I use for running and every day use. Lasted a long time and cost about 6$ to replace. Think about how much fun it is to charge your Garmin and find out mid-race it died on you.
  7. Colour/DesignIt looks nice. That might not mean much to some, but I like to plan what I wear when I run races, and the idea that this watch can have interchangeable bands and the watch itself is sleek and stunning is a big plus to me.

    The various colours of watches (more band patterns available than pictured). (c) Bia Sport

I know I sound like a saleswoman but really, it’s because I feel so passionate that women runners (and men too!) and atheletes in general have no real choices out there. And the options available are so not designed with the things in mind that I value.

I value security. That is one of my biggest concerns with running. I have always run inside until recently because of the lack of security when running alone. A girl was shot and killed in the apartment building next to mine and I live in what is considered to be a safe and family-friendly neighbourhood. Running outside is now a must-do for me and I want to feel like I’ve done everything I can to be safe and wise about my choices.

I also value functionality. This watch does everything I want: GPS, heart rate monitoring, speaking with my training site, etc. It also is easy to use when in motion and doesn’t weigh me down. I have seriously tiny wrists compared to the rest of me, and a Garmin looks like a monster on my wrist. The fact that the colourful bands are soft and comfortable, won’t pinch or catch, is a bonus.

Bia Sport’s kickstarter campaign has 7 days left and if they can’t reach their goal, the watch won’t be realised. I’m asking anyone and everyone with any interest to please help spread the word and ‘back’ this project. You can give as little as a dollar and pledging to buy a watch through this program (as opposed to when it finally goes to production) is a lot cheaper.

In case you want the link again, here’s their kickstarter page!

May 2 – Abs & Interval Cardio

I have a half marathon on Saturday. It’s my second of the year and unfortunately due to my recent illness, I had to cut back on my durance training the last couple weeks to allow myself to recover. Today was my first attempt at running since becoming sick, so I made it a half day of resistance and half day of interval cardio, taking it easier on the cardio. The goal was to get some miles on the feet, not attempt a long distance.

Group 1 – Repeat 4 times
Dragonflies: 15 reps – note: note: you want to have control the whole time, keeping your back straight as you reach the lower parts of the movement. Go as low as you can before your back arches, using your contracted abs to keep everything stable. Do not swing or bend your legs to get up and don’t go past the chest. You want a straight motion.
Scissor Leg Lowers: 20 reps (10 each leg change) – note: unlike in the video, I do a 2 second pause between switching legs. Like in the dragonflies above, focus on the core and keeping the lower back flat. You can rest your head on the ground if neck discomfort is an issue.
Heel Touches: 20 reps per side – note: try to raise your chest high enough so your shoulder blades are off the ground. If you have neck/throat/chest discomfort doing this, you can rest the head back down on the ground. It is best if you start with a pelvic tilt before raising your head/shoulders. Contract it down into the ground to form a strong core first.

Cardio
Distance: 2.37 miles
Time: 24:58
Interval running: 6.5 mph (2 minutes), 6.0 mph (2 minutes), 3.5 mph (1 minute)
Incline: 1.0 (15 minutes), 0.5 (5 minutes), 0.0 (5 minutes)